East & West Crypts

  • East & West Crypts

    East & West Crypts

    The largest medieval crypts in London

  • East & West Crypts

    East & West Crypts

    The largest medieval crypts in London

  • East & West Crypts

    East & West Crypts

    The largest medieval crypts in London

  • East & West Crypts

    East & West Crypts

    The largest medieval crypts in London

  • East & West Crypts

    East & West Crypts

    The largest medieval crypts in London

  • East & West Crypts

    East & West Crypts

    The largest medieval crypts in London

Immediately beneath Great Hall lie the oldest parts of Guildhall

Dating back to Edward the Confessor (1042) and divided into two rooms, the East and West Crypts are equally atmospheric, yet completely different in style.

The East Crypt survived the Great Fire and boasts a stunning vaulted ceiling decorated with carved bosses of heads, shields and flowers resting upon stone and marble pillars. The West Crypt, believed to date from the thirteenth century, was completely sealed off after collapsing under the weight of Great Hall's fallen roof in 1666. It was reopened in 1973, following extensive restoration.

With a maximum combined capacity of 500, the Crypts today provide an unusual and evocative space, either as a complement to Great Hall or more intimately on their own.


More about the East & West Crypts

  • East Crypt's windows, donated by the Clothworkers' Company, depict Guildhall in flames with a phoenix below – and five famous Londoners: Geoffrey Chaucer, William Caxton, Sir Thomas More, Sir Christopher Wren and Samuel Pepys
  • The windows of West Crypt represent some of the City's famous Livery companies
  • A banquet was served to Queen Victoria in the Crypts on 9th July, 1851
  • Look out for the dents on East Crypt's pillars – once at ground level, horses were tied up here while their owners went about their daily business

East & West Crypts image gallery (click to open slideshow)

360° venue view